Friday, May 2, 2008

Sunday Walk: Part 1


Here's what we were supposed to be doing:


Instead, we took off on a walk through the woods behind the house, hoping to find molly moochers (muggles, molly mashers, wild fish, or morels, depending on where you live).



Not too far into the woods, we passed an old rock pile, made back in the 1930's or earlier when this land (yes, hilly and steep as it is) was cleared to plant crops. You will find these rock piles all over the woods here, and early photos of the area show that until the 1960's much of this land was completely cleared for crops and grazing.



A small patch of wild mint (I've heard this called mountain mint) glows green amid old leaves.





The power of a strong wind can be seen in the way this tree was literally split from its trunk. It made a nice pile of firewood for us last winter.

Larry stalks the wild mushrooms...

.

And instead finds a strong spring in the side of the hill...


that has created a meandering path down the side of the mountain.



No mushrooms, but lots of things to see. That's the best part of a trip to the woods, isn't it?

6 comments:

Bayou Woman said...

I think I'd rather take a walk, too. It is so beautiful there. It's getting hot as blue blazes down the bayou already. I love the photos, too. We have something in common!
BW

metafootnotes said...

Reading your blog is like enjoying a cool breeze. I love your images! Thanks.

msmeta

Granny Sue said...

Thank you both. bayouwoman, your photos are showstoppers. I find a lot of peace when I'm taking pictures of the woods and gardens. I don't take nearly as many people pictures for some reason.

amy shinn said...

Your blog is very relaxing and educational!

Tipper said...

I love to see the piles of rocks in the woods. I always try to imagine the folks who piled those rocks in an effort to plant corn on the sides of mountains. My Dad can remember some of the fields around here-and I can not see planting on them-due to the slope of the land.

Granny Sue said...

Thank you, Amy. There is so much to know about these hills, I am learning something new every day.

Tipper, I do the same thing. I believe the rocks here were probably piled up by Ross Hinzman and his sons. He owned this land for a long time, and his daddy before him, back into the late 1800's if I remember right. One of his sons pointed out a place in the woods that was covered in pines where they used to grow wheat. I guess when you plow with horses it's possible to work steep land, but it also caused the loss of a lot of topsoil. People did things the way they knew how, and no one worried about erosion then.

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