Sunday, October 25, 2009

Jackson's Mill Images

On our last day of the West Virginia Storytelling Festival, I was up early (for reasons I may write about later) and decided to take a morning walk. the sun was just coming up on the hills, but in the valley only peeps of the day to come were visible.

This photo of the McWhorter Cabin reflects in the duck pond, with the early sun just visible on the hills behind it. According to the Jackson's Mill website: "The hewn-log McWhorter Cabin measures 18 feet by 24 feet and is markedly different from modern-day log houses because its chimney is built inside the walls as protection from Indian attacks. An outside chimney could conceivably be knocked in, exposing a gaping hole and rendering the occupants defenseless. McWhorter and his family lived in this cabin for 37 years, during which time it served a variety of functions including post office, church, and meeting house." The cabin was not actually built on this property; it was moved here in 1927 as an example of early pioneer architecture.


The lovely West Fork River sends up a thin fog in the morning cold--it had dropped below freezing the night before, leaving a thin coat of ice on my car windshield.


Jackson's Mill sits at the confluence of Sycamore Lick and the West Fork River. Again, from the Jackson's Mill website: "The mill on the West Fork River was established by Colonel Edward Jackson, a Revolutionary War figure, in 1801. Three generations of Jacksons operated grist and saw mills at this site. "




I am grateful to the people who had the foresight to protect historic sites such as this. Often in my travels I see where an old mill once stood, but the only traces of its existence might be stone foundations or a dam in the creek. This mill still stands due to the efforts of a diligent few who understood its importance in history.

On the grounds of the historic area, a wagon stands as if ready to do a day's work. Next to it is a small corn crib.


Today the mill that is in operation regularly to grind corn and wheat is Blaker's Mill, originally built in Greenbrier County and moved many years later to Jackson's Mill. The mill was donated by a descendant of the Blaker family, and was put into service at Jackson's Mill in 1993. Another example of people with vision and a sense of history.


The two cabins, the McWhorter Cabin and the Mary Conrad Cabin sit silently side by side as the sun begins to melt the morning frost.


It was a perfect morning for a walk. The quiet around the old buildings seemed to be filled with the voices of the past, telling their stories to those who come to listen. Sometimes a tour guide is not necessary; our imaginations can tell us the tales of what we see.

9 comments:

Rowan said...

Lovely photos, they really carry the feeling of quiet and tranquility and history. The early morning is the best time of day as far as I'm concerned.

laoi gaul~williams said...

thank you for these photos they are beautiful

Tipper said...

Glad you were up early-the pics are amazing!

Granny Sue said...

Thank you. It is a beautiful place. The decision isn't what will make a pretty picture, but which pictures to take.

Janet, said...

Susanne, I would love to go there! Thanks for the pictures.

Kate Dudding said...

Dear Granny Sue,

Your photo of McWhorter Cabin is drop-dead gorgeous. Isn't there some WV photo contest you could enter it in???

Hugs,
Kate

Granny Sue said...

I've never thought about entering photo contest, Kate. I might have to give it a try. Thans for the suggestion, and the compliment :-)

Susan at Stony River said...

I love these photos---and love that place! Can't wait to see it again.

"Sycamore Lick" ... oh the places we could go with THAT phrase...

I'm finally able to comment, after a few days of being bounced out every time. What gets in to Blogger anyhow???

Joy said...

Granny, your Jackson's Mill photos are supurb!

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